SAKE & PLUM WINE

SAKE & PLUM WINE
Saké
(SAH-kay)

The Rice Wine
Often referred to as rice wine, saké is not technically a wine. Instead, it is an alcoholic beverage made from brewing and fermenting rice and water, somewhat similar to brewing beer. Saké is made from different types of rice, like grape varieties in wine. These breeds of rice, which are usually big and fat grains, have varying flavor profiles that carry over into the saké produced. Saké is also made from water – in fact, 80% of saké is water. So the water used in making saké has a strong influence in the resultant saké’s flavor – hard water usually equals crisp saké, while softer water leads to smoother saké. Saké can be enjoyed hot, cold, or room temperature, with the best saké served chilled, giving a balance of sweetness and acidity.

The process
Saké begins with the polishing of rice. The grains are polished and milled to remove non-starch material, known to impart bad flavors in the saké. The amount that the rice is polished and milled controls its classification – the more polished the rice, the purer the saké and the higher the classification. The polished rice is then washed, rinsed, soaked and finally, steamed. After steaming, a mold called koji-kin is added to some of the rice. The purpose of the mold is to change the rice’s starch into sugar. Once this occurs, the saké-maker, or toji, adds yeast to begin the fermentation of the sugar into alcohol. Over a few days, batches of rice and water are added until the entire mixture has completed fermentation. Once complete, the fermented rice is pressed and the saké is filtered, pasteurized and bottled.

Rice & Water The rice used for making saké is called sakamai. Sakamai rice grains are big and fatter than what we normally see as rice. There are about 50 “varieties” of sakamai currently used, but about 9 basic types. Common types of sakamai are: Nishiki, Omachi, Miyama Nishiki, Gohyakumangoku. The type of rice, and the degree to which it is polished, determines the flavor and style of the saké. The water used in making saké is also integral to its final flavor. There are many compounds in water that are beneficial, and some that are detrimental. Most saké is made with high-quality, regional water, which helps define saké’s style – almost like terroir! Some areas have hard water, while others are known for soft water.

Classifications
There are two main types of saké, futsuu-shu, which is basic saké that has little classification and can include added starch or alcohol, and tokutei meishoshu, which means “special designation saké.” This saké contains its own sub-classifications that contain flavor profiles dependent on the rice, water and brewing methods used. Over 70% of saké is futsuu-shu, but most premium saké is tokutei meishoshu. The classifications of tokutei meishoshu include Junmai, Junmai-Ginjo and Junmai-Daiginjo.

Glossary
-shu – means “saké” in Japan and is used as a suffix for types of saké. 
saké – alcoholic beverage in Japanese. 
sakamai – the type of rice used for saké. 
koji-kin – the mold added to the steamed rice to change starch into sugar. 
nigori - unfiltered saké that maintains some of the lees from the rice. Most nigori is sweet and creamy, and thick with the unfermented rice solids. 
seimai-buai – the degree that the rice has been milled or polished. The percentage of seimai-bui represents the amount of the original rice left after milling. The lower the seimai-buai, the higher quality of saké. 
koji – saké-maker, or brewmaster. 
kura – the saké brewery, where saké is made.

Summing it up
Successful Sites: Japan
Common Descriptors: sweet & dry with a range of fla

Glossary :

joukan hot "sake" (around 50 degrees C (122 degrees F))

nurukan Warm "sake" (around 40 degrees C (104 degrees F))

hitohadakan lukewarm "sake" (around 35 degrees C (95 degrees F))

jouon "sake" served at room temperature

reishu chilled "sake" (5 degrees C (41 degrees F) to around 8 degrees C (46 degrees F))

kanzake hot or warm "sake"

nihonshudo "sake" meter value; a very general reference to the sweetness or dryness of "sake"

tokkuri the small jars used to hold and pour "sake"

choko/ochoko the tiny cups used for drinking "sake"

guinomi the larger sized cups used for drinking "sake"

TYPES OF SAKE :

Sake can be divided into the following groups according to the type of brewing process.

         Junmai
The name means "pure rice". Junmai is sake composed of only rice, water, koji and sake yeast. No other ingredients or additives, such as alcohol or sugar, are added. The rice that has been polished to 70% or less of its original size is used to brew. The sake character tends to have a full-bodied and slightly acidic.
           
         Honjozo
In this sake, not more than 120 liters or raw alcohol per each metric ton of white rice and no glucose have been added during brewing process.Added alcohol cannnot exceed 25% of the total alcohol in the finished product. In the U.S. it is not legal to make Honjozo or to add alcohol to sake. Imported Honjozo is categorized into distilled spirits.
The sake character tends to lighter than Junmai.
           
         Ginjo
Ginjo is a special type of Junmai or Honjozo, and considered the highest achievement of the brewer's art. All the rice employed in brewing Ginjo must be polished to at least 60% of its original size. Dai-Ginjo is brewed with the rice polished to at least 50%. In many Ginjo brewers use special yeasts in making Moto, and ferment the final mash very slowly at low temperature. This extra effort produce a sake that is lighter, clean taste and tangy flavor and an aroma.
           
         Nama
Nama means "Draft sake". In this sake, fresh sake is microfiltered instead of other sake is pasteurized twice, once before aging and once in the process of bottling. Nama is fruity and fresh taste with pleasant aroma.
           
         Nigori
Nigori -"Cloudy"- sake is unfilterd or roughly filterd so that some Moromi in the fermenting tank make it into the bottle. This sake is a milky white appearance.
Nigori is bold and sweet taste.
           
         Genshu
Genshu is undiluted sake. After filtration, sake has an alcohol content of around 19%. Most of sake on the market have been diluted with water until their alcohol contents falls to between 12 and 16%. Genshu is full-bodied and rich taste.

 

PLACING ORDER:
OUR WEB SITE SHOWS LIMITED QUANTITIES AVAILABILITY. WHEN PLACING AN ORDER IF YOU NEED MORE QUANTITIES PLEASE GIVE US A CALL AND WE CAN UP DATE EXACT QUANTITIES AVAILABLE AND UP DATE THE INVENTORY ON OUR WEB SITE BEFORE YOU PLACE THE ORDER.


Positive SSL Secured Website Paypal Verified